Canadians are forced to rely on ‘3% solution’ after shut-down Toronto streets

Story highlights Although the Canadian Army described the closures as a “riot prevention exercise,” no such exercises were planned. Even with the closures, traffic still moves slowly. Drivers driving north on Jarvis Street have…

Canadians are forced to rely on '3% solution' after shut-down Toronto streets

Story highlights Although the Canadian Army described the closures as a “riot prevention exercise,” no such exercises were planned.

Even with the closures, traffic still moves slowly.

Drivers driving north on Jarvis Street have been baffled by the sudden closure of three lanes going into Yonge Street in Toronto for months.

Although the closures were supposed to be temporary until a “riot prevention exercise” could be conducted by the Canadian Army, no such exercise has been planned. The closures were even extended for three months after the army announced the exercise late last year, as the military is not capable of setting up in a short amount of time.

Meanwhile, the traffic has been an ongoing headache for drivers, some who have remarked they can’t even get off the freeway if they are coming out of the park. Some have reported commuters that are entering the work zone even though only one lane is open to traffic.

Indeed, the setup makes a lot of sense, and is much more efficient than what was available in 2017, when it took crews just five minutes to clear a stalled semi on that same stretch of road. In other words, it’s vastly better to delay traffic for weeks on end than to try and clean up a car stuck in traffic on one particular segment of road.

Here’s why:

We’re big fans of the 3% solution at Road Test HQ — not just for traffic but for messy situations. By using only 80% of a roadway to get up and running, the roads are able to move more swiftly without the walls of congestion that would otherwise occur in a bigger-scale operation.

During the blackout and flooding in Houston in the wake of Hurricane Harvey, 5% of the city’s roads were used as emergency access zones so that commuters could get back to work, while 80% of the roads were empty and left to the power of Mother Nature. (All of which makes sense considering 90% of Houstonians live in downtown Houston.)

Also remember that while we’ve put together this list, there may still be delays. The last time we focused on closures in Canada for motorists, it was snowing — and every single closure happened during one of the worst snowfalls to hit that country in recent history. With that in mind, we are bracing ourselves for more traffic snarls on Jarvis Street — and even more rage in the weeks to come.

Story originally published on Road Test.

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