CDC: An important antibiotic-resistant bacteria is on the market — should you get it?

The week ahead for antibiotic-resistant infections Bacteria have a variety of mutations that make them more resistant to existing drugs. Now comes the most important phase of a vaccine from Covington, Kentucky’s Sandoz for…

CDC: An important antibiotic-resistant bacteria is on the market — should you get it?

The week ahead for antibiotic-resistant infections Bacteria have a variety of mutations that make them more resistant to existing drugs.

Now comes the most important phase of a vaccine from Covington, Kentucky’s Sandoz for a childhood condition that is a leading cause of serious and sometimes deadly infections in kids: COVID-19. The fact that the antibiotic-resistant germs couldn’t be engineered to be spread easily means this vaccine might be particularly effective at stopping them.

Mychedema is when an infection interferes with the normal secretion of fluid that is essential for bone development. It’s one of the most common causes of leg infection in infants. Sometimes the infection is mild, but it’s rarely associated with death. If the anemia due to an anemia of these fluids continues for more than two months, the situation could become life-threatening.

“The thing is we have a vaccine that gives an immunity against all the strains of those bacteria, and yet the virus is still virulent and can be spread easily from person to person,” said Dr. Donald B. Brown, a pediatrics infectious disease specialist at Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center. “If you can protect people who are going to be vaccinated for the first time, that might help them.”

The impact of this vaccine won’t occur in the next few months or even in the next couple of years, experts said. However, it will be an important reminder that COVID-19 is at least a step forward. While the short term of a flu vaccine and the longer term of a flu shot is far from identical, scientists with nearly everyone that I spoke with agree that we can only go so far with a vaccine for something like COVID-19.

The emphasis on COVID-19 should be viewed in the context of the whole portfolio of antibiotics, some of which produce long-lasting, substantial long-term immunity, said Dr. J. Brian Murray, a microbial infection expert at the CDC. “It takes a very strong community and community of physicians and people taking these drugs over a number of years to build up very, very extensive immune responses,” Murray said.

In other words, there are a lot of pieces to building a vaccine for COVID-19. Still, Murray said, “when you see a vaccine that can be effective against dozens and dozens of strains in such a small amount of time, it is exciting.”

The COVID-19 vaccine is relatively complex, Murray said. The virus, for instance, can’t multiply and spread with three or four days, but with a five day incubation period, it presents more risk of spreading to other patients, he said. So the vaccine contains more protein from the virus to make the vaccine more broadly effective, and the vaccine also features added virus protection because some of the DNA that binds to the immune system contains other proteins from the virus, all of which helps the vaccine give kids a stronger immunity against multiple strains.

Some anti-pandemic preparedness experts are hopeful that COVID-19 will be especially effective at protecting children, but it isn’t exactly built for that. Since infants are especially prone to infections that are spread widely among an immune system that’s not ready for what the germs are doing, research published in August found that bacteria that may contain COVID-19 fared worse in the samples than bacteria that lacked COVID-19. The study was only presented in January, but that’s not uncommon; about 80 percent of study details are released in advance of the researchers giving them at a conference.

If this vaccine protects kids, Covington-based Sandoz, the vaccine’s developer, will continue to push it. Three is all they really want right now: three companies in which to patent their vaccine technology. The time spent behind this research process will probably allow other companies time to figure out their own strategies for producing anti-toxins.

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