Ontario to get go-ahead from Environment Canada to restore power, but no breaks

Environment Canada says storm creating power outages in country’s most populous province, but no claims of broken grid have been filed Environment Canada confirmed on Friday that an incredible 600-plus cases of electrical damage…

Ontario to get go-ahead from Environment Canada to restore power, but no breaks

Environment Canada says storm creating power outages in country’s most populous province, but no claims of broken grid have been filed

Environment Canada confirmed on Friday that an incredible 600-plus cases of electrical damage have been reported for the third time in a week in Ontario, but it says none of those cases involve the breaking of the local power grid.

Hundreds of residents in communities in the province’s west and south have been suffering power outages following a storm, but so far no reports of broken grids have been filed.

Power failures in Ontario: time for post-disaster planning Read more

Nova Scotia, the nation’s most populous province, was hit with an ice storm on Sunday, which knocked out power for a quarter of the island’s residents, affecting more than 60,000 homes and businesses.

Claudia Gray, Environment Canada’s senior climatologist, said satellite images and local radar showed the storm took down trees and lineages on the western side of Lake Ontario, in some cases downing power lines for a distance of 12 miles (20km).

The storm resulted in the destruction of more than 700 trees.

The “Atlantic energy hub” on the island suffered a power failure. Power has been restored to all but 70,000 Nova Scotians, with the rest of the outages projected to be restored by Wednesday.

Three Canadians have died during recent storms in different parts of the country.

A Canadian family was killed when the SUV they were in was caught in a sudden snowstorm in the United States, and another died on a snow-covered road in Quebec while driving to work. The funeral for a Canadian-born passenger in the US incident was scheduled for Friday.

Numerous transit services in Toronto were affected by Thursday’s intense storm that caused transit delays, including closing four subway stations and leaving 14,000 people without service.

The Toronto police service said a man died in a “freak accident” when the cable that ran between subway cars snapped at Woodbine station. A 23-year-old man was waiting for a train inside the station and was struck by the cable, which went off of a third rail.

Further south, more than 100,000 people were without power in Quebec when an ice storm hit the province, state-owned Hydro-Quebec reported on Friday.

Tens of thousands of residents in Ontario and Nova Scotia have been without power in the wake of the ice storm. Hydro-Quebec has warned it may be of weeks before some of its hardest-hit areas are restored to power.

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