WATCH: Red Dead Redemption 2 Uses Science To Demonstrate Footage, Complex Animation

ROCKSTAR recently released a special quiz that allowed gamers to guess the “ultimate outcome” of each level in the long-awaited Red Dead Redemption 2. Players were required to answer five questions, ranging from whether…

WATCH: Red Dead Redemption 2 Uses Science To Demonstrate Footage, Complex Animation

ROCKSTAR recently released a special quiz that allowed gamers to guess the “ultimate outcome” of each level in the long-awaited Red Dead Redemption 2.

Players were required to answer five questions, ranging from whether the player was “the good guy” or the “bad guy,” whether there was enough power in each pistol, and whether the player would kill every rival over the course of the adventure. Each question had a full-screen box around it with a bullet icon to indicate if the answer was correct.

A total of 1,500 possible answers were provided. To make this quiz fun and interactive, the game used a scientific method in order to determine the “ultimate outcome.”

Video games have often used advanced computer graphics and/or image optimization to obtain the best graphics or playfulness possible in the hopes of convincing players to spend time on their platforms. In Red Dead Redemption 2, a swarm of bees (like the bees seen here) were employed for some background shots of Saint Denis.

Instead of deploying bees, however, the game developers relied on moving the frame-by-frame photogrammetry process and using the frames that have the bee icon over any such other recognizable image or real-world-made images to determine the ideal “Snapshot” image before choosing any frame that also included the bee emoji.

The live-action sequence above shows how the process was completed. Each animated frame must be combined into a single frame. After uploading the frame, the system only makes changes to the bee image to “complete the shot” by adding its own textures and borders.

READ MORE: EA Responds To Calls To Ban “Red Dead Redemption 2”

In the background of the scene above, in a reflection of the player’s snare, one must spot a tallgrass prairie and sand dunes flying out into the air. A great deal of stage scenery was added to this specific shot because of how many new digital frames were needed to complete the scene.

Now that the study of photogrammetry has been done, it’s believed that it’s possible to create just about any single object in the world. One thing to be aware of, however, is that the removal of a layer of photogrammetry renders the true physicality of the object physically impossible.

For example, the wide beams of light reflected from a distant bush, which was used in the live-action scene above, would never make it to the surface of the lens. The real tree will appear as a single light shaft reflected off a backdrop. However, the same technique can be used with digital objects to look as if they were still in motion.

There’s a significant learning curve that can be apparent when using photogrammetry, but the inherent creativity that goes into motion-capture and motion-process can be truly amazing. A slow phase change for a raven can occur many times, even without vibrating the bird.

That’s why Red Dead Redemption 2 contains so many mini-games that would make some highly talented computer game designers green with envy.

Watch: The RSI Phenomenon Impacts Fantasy Authors

Leave a Comment