World’s biggest TV manufacturers warned over apps

The nation’s biggest TV manufacturers have been warned to rethink the way they organise the apps that come with their sets, after it emerged cleaning the remote would cause them to stop functioning Now…

World's biggest TV manufacturers warned over apps

The nation’s biggest TV manufacturers have been warned to rethink the way they organise the apps that come with their sets, after it emerged cleaning the remote would cause them to stop functioning

Now that all TV manufacturers have joined the smartphone wars and want you to tell them what shows you want to watch and buy, there is more software to learn than you can shake a remote at.

In the latest exploit found in televisions, makers of the latest models are now under pressure to change the way they organise their apps that come with the sets.

According to reports, the British arm of Calrec Audio – the company behind the Mix console which plays host to a wide range of BBC programmes – uncovered that cleaning the remote would stop the TV working.

It was a clear indicator that that, along with products from Panasonic, MHL and Samsung, similar models were failing.

The experts said such fiddling with the remote would make the TV useless and so they replaced it with a newer one.

This is in breach of the rules around websites including www.tvguide.co.uk, where users can see the far reaching impact.

The non-profit promotion website, which is part of the BBC Trust and is funded by a licence fee, which is paid by British television viewers, has seen its traffic collapse.

Particularly effective at the time of the current Olympics, its website saw traffic soar from 60,000 to 150,000 during peak viewing times from Friday 17 to Sunday 18 August. By Monday 18 August, it dropped to 40,000 and has since stayed around those levels.

While it cannot be said that the riots in England are the cause of the internet carnage, it has boosted traffic to www.TVguide.co.uk as users click on the safety tips, which a spokesperson said they would be implementing.

“We also carry a number of brands and have seen a fall in traffic – there’s definitely been a strong decrease in traffic, which should be seen in the context of the current Olympics. We’re working with the technology to come up with a solution,” a spokesperson said.

The issue is not exclusive to the country, with a Twitter campaign, #ComeOnTVGuideStopThat, providing entertainment elsewhere.

“Too much meddling with TV software,” one suggested.

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