How members of a New York gang planned the murder of a teen named Mark Campbell

In the interview transcripts, co-defendant Larry Woodworth states he “wound” Ahmaud Arbery after the killing of Mark Campbell but he cannot remember how or when and does not remember the detail of Arbery’s exact…

How members of a New York gang planned the murder of a teen named Mark Campbell

In the interview transcripts, co-defendant Larry Woodworth states he “wound” Ahmaud Arbery after the killing of Mark Campbell but he cannot remember how or when and does not remember the detail of Arbery’s exact wounds. Another member of the gang in the case, Tim Hicks, says he got into a physical altercation with Arbery but cannot recall what happened.

The murder case involves Darryl “Mistah D” Walker, a member of the K-Block crew who lived in the hallway of the apartment building where Campbell was murdered, a first-degree murder count. Walker is one of nine people in the Montgomery County courthouse this week as a jury tries to decide which of the accused will live to spend the rest of their lives in prison.

Around 10:45pm on Feb. 1, 2018, a group of people heard a fight on the second floor, headed downstairs and saw a group of men fighting each other. They ran back up to the elevator with cameras rolling, videotaping the fight, according to the video.

Shortly afterward, they saw Campbell lying on the ground in the stairwell of the building. It was later determined that Campbell had been shot in the back. Surveillance video also revealed that the group seen fighting later saw an African-American man in a red shirt walk past on the stairs before leaving the building and Campbell was shot in the stairwell by someone believed to be armed. The group could not identify the shooter but they could identify the red shirt suspect.

Although jurors are watching the videotapes of the altercation, they’re not allowed to hear a forensic computer analyst testify how he read Smith’s cellphone records to determine where he was at the time of the incident. A judge ruled that because Arbery and other witnesses claim to have heard gunshots at the time of the incident, they don’t have to be told about Smith’s location at the time of the shooting.

Jurors were also told that the attorneys were not permitted to read the 911 call Campbell made, when he reported that four people were beating him and someone was shooting at him before he collapsed on the ground.

Each of the accused say they fired a gun. Witnesses who have testified, on cross-examination, that they heard two shots, or heard someone yell out, “Bang,” have stated that they didn’t actually hear gunshots.

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