Lavish toys: Airbus flying taxi will haul 550 passengers and store the most it can carry

An aircraft that revolutionizes the way we travel by carrying far more passengers than modern jets can is under development by Airbus. Lavish toys In an interview with the Flight International website, Airbus’ deputy…

Lavish toys: Airbus flying taxi will haul 550 passengers and store the most it can carry

An aircraft that revolutionizes the way we travel by carrying far more passengers than modern jets can is under development by Airbus.

Lavish toys

In an interview with the Flight International website, Airbus’ deputy CEO John Leahy touted the jet’s huge payload capability, saying it could fit 525 passengers on board.

That’s about twice as many as Boeing’s 777 jetliner.

The plane can carry the weight of all of the 777’s 800 passengers — even its backup airplane — even after weight and-balance calculations are applied. It has a wingspan of 214 feet.

“If you want to fly a lot of people and big cargo, something like this is going to be very useful,” Leahy told Flight International.

On the Horizon?

Airbus released a concept video of the plane, in development by Concept One, this week.

In the video, aerial scenes show a modern cityscape, complete with modern homes and tall buildings, a dense traffic jam, waterfront views, and smog-ridden skies.

But out of the plane, come not just rows of seats but skylights, huge windows, and plenty of puffy clouds.

The plane would carry a large amount of goods because it’s designed to be reliable enough to keep people and cargo aloft.

“As with all aircraft, it will need to fly a lot of passengers while handling very heavy cargo,” Airbus said in a statement.

Then there’s the problem of wind resistance. Airbus described the concept in a statement as “bullet aircraft” to illustrate the concept’s versatility.

“When there is a heavy wind shear in the same area of the sky (for example from the south), the aircraft will shift to a different wind pattern to avoid direct weight and balance issues,” the company said.

“This system prevents the aircraft from repeatedly impacting the weight and balance control systems to maintain aircraft stability.”

Related: A plan that can soon carry people around the world in 7 hours

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